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After 19 years of cold war, US and Taliban sign historic peace deal

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The United States government and the Afghan Taliban signed a historic peace agreement on Saturday.

The agreement was signed in Doha, Qatar, by the US Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation, Zalmay Khalilzad, who is also the America chief negotiator in the talks with the Taliban and Afghan’s President, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar.

The US Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, witnessed the signing of the agreement.

The two parties reached an agreement a few days ago after a protracted negotiation that lasted almost two years.

According to the document released to journalists after the signing of the agreement, Washington will reduce the number of US troops in the country and end the 19 years hostilities between the Taliban and the US military.

In addition, at least 6,400 out of 13,000 US troops will leave Afghanistan in four months time, while the Taliban is expected to meet certain anti-terrorism conditions.

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The US troops will also leave Afghanistan in April 2022, giving the Afghan government and the Taliban control over their homeland.

Pompeo, who spoke to journalists after the event, said the US “would closely watch the Taliban’s compliance with their commitments, and calibrate the pace of our withdrawal to their actions.”

“This is how we will ensure that Afghanistan never again serves for international terrorists,” he added.

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