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FIFA hopes to reach consensus on biennial World Cup plans in December

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FIFA, NFF

World football governing body, FIFA is hoping that by December, 2021, the debates around holding the World every two years rather than four years, will be put to rest.

The football house had earlier this year kicked off consultations on the possibility of making the men and women’s global showpieces a biennial affair.

Several meetings are being held regarding the move, but a resolution is yet to be reached, with some European federations reportedly threatening to boycott the games if FIFA went ahead with the plan.

But the Fifa Council – the main decision-making body consisting of 37 elected representatives – met on Wednesday and the plans for a new international match calendar were discussed.

Following the meeting, President Gianni Infantino told newsmen that the “discussions were heated but they were positive.”

Read Also: Biennial World Cup poses threat to other sports, gender equality -IOC

The Swiss added that he hoped that a “common consensus” will be found when the issue is discussed again at a global summit in December.

“The debate has been and will probably continue to be heated,” continued Infantino.

“I understand being passionate myself about football that you can have different opinions.

“We have received some legitimate criticism and some enthusiastic comments as well.

“It is so important for everyone to make their voice heard. Boycotts were not discussed today.

“I am confident on 20 December we will be able to present a common solution.

“For me, everything is open. It is not my proposal or decision. I have to facilitate the dialogue and bring everyone together.”

The men’s World Cup has been held every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 because of World War Two.

The women’s tournament has also been every four years since it began in 1991.

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