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Global Covid-19 cases hit 16m, as Italian city slaps $1,150 fines on violators of mask rule

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Global Covid-19 cases hit 16m, as Italian city slaps $1,150 fines on violators of mask rule

A tally by Johns Hopkins University has revealed that the number of the COVID-19 infections has hit 16 million worldwide; while more than 644,500 have died, since the outbreak of the pandemic.

The figures provided by the Johns Hopkins University late on Saturday also revealed that more than 9.26 million people worldwide have recovered from the deadly disease which has fast spread across the globe.

Meanwhile, several countries report a resurgence of the virus with cases in Germany increasing by 305 to 205,269, Reuters news agency reported on Sunday quoting data from the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases.

READ ALSO: COVID-19: Mainland China records 34 new cases of infections

In a related development, failure to wear a mask inside stores in the southern Italian city of Salerno has proven costly to many.

Three people in the port city in the Campania region received 1,000-euro ($1,150) fines on Saturday, the Corriere della Sera reported.

Campania Governor Vincenzo De Luca signed an ordinance on Friday, provisioning for fines of up to 1,000 euros for not wearing masks in closed public places. Similar fines were handed out on the tourist island of Ischia, in three cafes and in a restaurant, also in the Campania region.

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