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Hearing in Tiktok lawsuit against US ban fixed for September

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A date in the month of September has been scheduled for Tiktok lawsuit, which seeks to overturn the recently enacted “Foreign Adversary Controlled Applications” law, which is headed towards outlawing the well-known social media platform.

Tiktok is seeking to challenge the law, which was approved earlier this year, in favor of designating it as a foreign entity and requiring it to sell to an American company or face the ban.

According to a Reuters story, TikTok has been given a hearing schedule to make oral arguments in support of its case against the United States over a law that might prohibit them.

The District of Columbia was granted this date by the US Court of Appeals so that all sides could be heard in court and the nation’s Department of Justice could have an opportunity to submit its case.

READ ALSO: Eight TikTok creators file suit against US govt to stop law that would ban app

Recall weeks ago that TikTok and ByteDance filed a complaint and lawsuit against the US government, which was forwarded to the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, initiating their legal battle.

In the lawsuit, TikTok and ByteDance say the law “would allow the government to decide that a company may no longer own and publish the innovative and unique speech platform it created. If Congress can do this, it can circumvent the First Amendment by invoking national security and ordering the publisher of any individual newspaper or website to sell to avoid being shut down.”

The law will “silence the 170 million Americans who use the platform to communicate in ways that cannot be replicated elsewhere,” TikTok and ByteDance alleged.

“By banning all online platforms and software applications offered by ‘TikTok’ and all ByteDance subsidiaries, Congress has made a law curtailing massive amounts of protected speech,” the lawsuit said. “Unlike broadcast television and radio stations, which require government licenses to operate because they use the public airwaves, the government cannot, consistent with the First Amendment, dictate the ownership of newspapers, websites, online platforms, and other privately created speech forums.”

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