Connect with us

Tech

Russian hackers hit US power grid

Published

on

Russian hackers hit US power grid

A Russian government-linked hacker has infiltrated a dozen companies linked to the US power grid in recent months, a report from cybersecurity firm Symantec says.

The group behind the attack is known as Dragonfly, and has recently become active after years of radio silence. Symantec has been tracking the group since 2011, and exposed its attacks on Western companies back in 2014.

“Dragonfly 2.0,” as Symantec is calling it, shares tools and techniques with the old group, but has particularly targeted the energy sector since its resurgence in 2015.

Read also: Facebook AI researchers teaching bots to have human-like expression

“The Dragonfly group appears to be interested in both learning how energy facilities operate and also gaining access to operational systems themselves, to the extent that the group now potentially has the ability to sabotage or gain control of these systems should it decide to do so,” Symantec wrote.

It’s often in the interests of security firms to play up the dangers of cyberattacks — Symantec’s blog post casually mentions that “Symantec customers are protected against the activities of the Dragonfly group” — but the prospect of a state actor attacking the national power grid is a worst-case-scenario for cyberwarfare, and Symantec is saying that it’s within the capabilities of a Russian-linked hacking group.

RipplesNigeria… without borders, without fears

Click here to join the Ripples Nigeria WhatsApp group for latest updates.

Join the conversation

Opinions

Support Ripples Nigeria, hold up solutions journalism

Balanced, fearless journalism driven by data comes at huge financial costs.

As a media platform, we hold leadership accountable and will not trade the right to press freedom and free speech for a piece of cake.

If you like what we do, and are ready to uphold solutions journalism, kindly donate to the Ripples Nigeria cause.

Your support would help to ensure that citizens and institutions continue to have free access to credible and reliable information for societal development.

Donate Now

Investigations