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ALLEGED N2.2BN FRAUD: Nigerian govt reaches out to Niger Republic, US over Maina

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UNBELIEVABLE! No court order yet declaring Abdulrasheed Maina wanted

The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) said on Thursday the Federal Government has reached out to the Niger Republic and the United States in search of the ex-Chairman of Pension Reform Task Team, Abdulrasheed Maina, who is believed to have jumped bail.

The commission arraigned Maina on several count charges of fraud and money laundering to the tune of N2.2 billion.

The EFCC stated this in a counter-affidavit against the bail application filed by the Chairman of Senate Committee on Army, Ali Ndume, who stood as a surety for the defendant.

The anti-graft agency said the federal government contacted the countries in its efforts to execute the arrest warrant issued against the ex-pension task team chief by the Federal High Court, Abuja.

READ ALSO: Maina writes Malami, urges review of criminal charges

Justice Okon Abang had on Monday ordered Ndume to be remanded in a correctional facility for failing to produce Maina in court.

He had earlier revoked the bail granted the defendant and ordered his arrest.

The judge also directed Maina’s trial to proceed in absentia.

The EFCC’s affidavit read:

“The prosecution has obtained the bench warrant and it is making frantic efforts to execute it while enlisting the support of other security agencies in the country as well as some foreign governments, particularly the Republic of Niger and the United States.”

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