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Super Falcons begin AWCON title defence with 2-1 defeat to S’Africa

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Nigeria women’s senior football team, the Super Falcons have started their 2022 Africa Women’s Cup of Nations (AWCON) campaign with a 2-1 defeat to Banyana Banyana of South Africa.

After a goalless first half, the Falcons trailed 2-0 following quick goals by Jermaine Seoposenwe and Hilda Magaia in the 61st and 63rd minutes respectively.

In the dying minutes, Falcons pulled a goal back through Rasheedat Ajibade, who bagged the consolation on 90+2 minutes.

Defending champions Nigeria have won the competition a total of nine times, and are hoping to clinch a 10th title in Morocco.

Read Also: Pinnick confident Falcons’ll extend AWCON reign amid S’Africa’s dethronement plot

The victory for South Africa was a repeat of the 2018 edition where the Banyana also pipped the Falcons 1-0 in their opener.

South Africa who are strong contenders of the title this time are now leaders of Group C.

Ripples Nigeria recalls that South Africa had defeated the Falcons in Lagos late last year when they triumphed 4-2 in the Aishat Buhari Cup.

The Falcons will be playing against Botswana and Burundi in their remaining group C games at the tournament, with hope of advancing to the next round.

All four semifinalist in the Morocco tournament will represent Africa in the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup billed to be hosted jointly by Australia and New Zealand.

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